CSBR at the Global Feminist LBQ Women*’s Conference
July 25, 2019 – 8:35 am | Comments Off on CSBR at the Global Feminist LBQ Women*’s Conference

CSBR Coordinator, Rima Athar, was one of the Content Committee Working Group members that organized the first ever Global Feminist Lesbian, Bisexual and Queer (LBQ) Women*’s Conference, which took place from 6-9 July 2019, in …

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Men in Charge? Rethinking Authority in Muslim Legal Tradition

Submitted by on June 7, 2015 – 9:38 amNo Comment

Men in Charge? Front Cover
In April 2015, MUSAWAH–the global movement for equality in the Muslim family–launched an exciting new book which “shows that the assumption that God gave men authority over women is a theological fiction that became a legal fiction, whose main function now is to sustain gender inequality.” [1]

SYNOPSIS

Muslim legal tradition does not treat men and women equally. At the root of this discrimination lies a theological assumption: God has given men authority over women. This assumption is justified with reference to a Qur’anic verse (4:34) and is expressed in two key legal concepts that underlie the logic of most contemporary Muslim family laws. One, qiwamah, generally denotes a husband’s authority over his wife. The other, wilayah, refers to the right and duty of male family members to exercise guardianship over female members and the privileging of fathers over mothers in guardianship of their children.

Based on exciting new feminist research, Men in Charge? critically engages with this assumption and challenges male authority and gender discrimination from within the Muslim legal tradition. The authors trace how male dominance came to be inherent in the tradition, show how it is produced and sustained in contemporary times, and indicate how the tradition can be reformed in order to promote gender equality and justice.

The contributors are academics and activists from varied disciplines and backgrounds who were brought together by Musawah. Since its launch in 2009, Musawah has sought to produce new knowledge to support local and national movements as they develop and advocate for change.

Summaries of the chapters are available on MUSAWAH’s site here, and insights on the processes behind the book by editor Ziba Mir-Hosseini can be read on Open Democracy here.

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